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Winter 2002 Presentation Products Guide

Projectors & Presenters

Eiki's Notebook Three series portable projectors come with true SGA or SVGA projection capabilities for computer and video images. The Notebook Three series delivers images at a 90 percent uniformity and 350:1 contrast ratio, at an SXGA or SVGA resolution, and in rich three-panel LCD color. In addition to their native resolution, the projectors' smart scaling technology makes them compatible with the next highest input resolution (SXGA or XGA) down to VGA, Mac resolutions and normal and widescreen video in most major standards. Eiki International Inc., (800) 242-3454, www.eiki.com.


 

JVC expands its line of visual presenters with its AV-P950, a versatile multimedia presenter that features high-resolution XGA images and three-picture memory, along with USB and RS-232C interfaces. The AV-P950 produces high-resolution XGA images, and can be connected to a projector or a monitor with SVGA or VGA resolution. The USB interface on this model allows presenters to transfer images to a PC for processing. Processed images can then be projected via the AV-P950. The monitor can also act like a 3-D scanner, allowing the presenter to download any image via the USB interface for future projection use in other applications. JVC Professional Products Co., (800) 526-5308, www.jvc.com/pro.


Mitsubishi's XL1 and SL1 are the company's first 0.7" LCD-based micro- portable projectors. Both feature 1,000 ANSI lumens of brightness for XGA and SVGA models - the XL1 featuring true XGA with compression for SXGA, the SL1 featuring true SVGA with compression for XGA. Advanced features for the projectors include Mitsubishi's ColorView Natural Color Matrix and sRGB color compliance; IRIS (intelligent room illumination sensor) control, which senses room brightness and adjusts the projector's contrast and image controls to create the best image; and CineView, which transforms and maintains image sharpness for electronic displays. Mitsubishi Digital Electronics, (888) 880-6351, www.mitsubishi-presentations.com.


NEC Technologies' VT45 ultraportable projector offers 1,000 ANSI lumens of brightness, supports data sources from VGA to SXGA, and contains the same video processing technology as NEC's higher-end models. In addition, the VT45 comes with NEC's AutoSense Technology, which allows automatic set up and one-touch adjustments. NEC's VORTEX Technology Plus gives users enhanced abilities to easily fine-tune image coloring with this model. The VT45 is compatible with most computers as well as a broad range of signals, including S-Video, video, component video and HDTV. It also features AccuBlend Intelligent Pixel Blending Technology for high-quality native and non-native resolution display up to SXGA. NEC Technologies Inc., (800) NEC-INFO, www.nectech.com/presentationproducts.


Part of Sharp Electronics' Conference Series Projectors, the XG-P20X delivers 3,300 ANSI lumens of brightness with native XGA resolution. It also features Advanced ImageACE resizing, enabling it to handle images up to UXGA resolutions, as well as various Mac and electronic workstation digital signals. The XG-P20X is equipped with next-generation GyroPoint RF Technology, which lets the user effectively operate the unit from any angle within a 100' radius. The projector has two computer inputs and one digital video interface (DVI-D) input. In addition, it has separate composite and S-Video inputs, ensuring connectivity to more than one video source, as well as HDTV and component video via a single RGB input. Sharp Electronics Corp., (888) GO-SHARP, www.SharpLCD.com.


The VPL-CS4, VPL-CX4 and VPL-CX11 models comprise Sony's new ultra- and portable projectors based on three-panel LCD technology displaying high brightness. The VPL-CS4 features 1,000 ANSI lumens of brightness, SVGA resolution and weighs less than 5.5 lbs. The VPL-CX4 also features 1,000 ANSI lumens of brightness and projects images from three 0.7" true XGA resolution LCD panels. It also comes with twin speakers on either side of the controls. Finally, the VPL-CX11 features 1,500 ANSI lumens of brightness and XGA resolution. Sony Electronics Inc., (800) 686-7669, www.sony.com.


Monitors & Displays

The TH-37PWD4UZ 37" professional display is the newest widescreen addition to Panasonic's family of high-contrast, high-brightness information plasma displays. It features a viewing angle of 160 degrees and a contrast ratio of 3,000:1. The 37" display provides expanded computer and video signal compatibility that supports display of VGA through UXGA resolution computer graphics and DTV/HDTV signals. Panasonic, www.panasonic.com.


RCA/Thomson Commercial Electronics' PHD50300 is a 50" digital plasma HDTV monitor with a digital video resolution of 1,365 x 768 and a 500:1 typical panel contrast ratio.

Its display is about 4" deep and offers a 160-degree viewing angle. The monitor's built-in stereo amplifier enhances stereo performance and can power optional speakers. RCA/Thomson Commercial Electronics, (800) 336-1900, www.thomsoncommercial.com.

 


Samsung Electronics introduces four new TFT flat-panel displays: the SyncMaster 151B, 171B, 151S and 171S, all available in 15" and 17" monitor sizes. The B series slim monitors are Pivot Enabled, and come with a swivel base for instant switching between portrait and landscape viewing. The 17" 171B features a Patterned Vertical Alignment screen, the latest technological advancement in liquid crystal cell structure. It also has an ultrafine pixel pitch of 0.264 mm with a maximum XGA resolution. The S series is offered as a more affordable option to the B Series. The 17" model features Advanced Imaging Scaling for high-quality images and offers a 0.297 mm pixel pitch with a maximum XGA resolution. Samsung Electronics, (800) SAMSUNG, www.samsungmonitor.com.


Zenith's 46 Series computer-ready TV monitor-receivers are made for educators' large-screen computing applications in both Windows and Mac environments. Offering 27", 32" and 36" models, the 46 Series offers true SVGA resolution with crisp computer images. By incorporating Zenith's PCZ3000 computer card, 46 Series models are capable of delivering up to a 1,600 x 1,200 resolution, with a refresh rate of 100 Hz. The 46 Series offers educators exclusive features, including a SuperPort for easy installation of accessory modules without removing the cabinet back, which also makes tampering difficult; and easy-access front audio/video jacks. Zenith, (888) 865-3026, www.zenith.com.

 

 

 


Product Showcase

Canon has introduced a PC-free presentation system that combines the LV-7345 ultraportable LCD multimedia projector, the PR-200S Presentation Assistant and the LV-MC01 Compact Flash Imager, to produce a flexible system for educators. The LV-7345 projector offers 2,100 ANSI lumens of brightness, and is capable of projecting image sizes up to 300" with 90 percent uniformity. And educators who use the industry standard Type I Flash card to store presentations and digital images can place the card into Canon's new optional LV-MC01 Compact Flash Imager to display the contents without a PC. The LV-MC01 fits into the DVI (digital visual interface) terminal on the rear of the projector and maintains the integrity of the original digital recording. The final element of the presentation system includes the PR-200S Presentation Assistant, which works as a portable color scanner. The PR-200S scans items, including paper documents, overhead transparencies, images and handwritten notes, then converts them into crisp, clear images. Canon U.S.A., (800) OK-CANON, www.usa.canon.com.


Philips new cSmart SV1 projector features up to 6,000 hours of lamp life and an end-user replaceable lamp. It delivers 1,000 ANSI lumens of brightness with true SVGA resolution. The cSmart's small footprint makes it highly portable and perfect for multiple classroom or presentation room needs. It is designed with Philips Air System heat diffusion technology, which reduces the emitted sound and helps maintain a low temperature, making it ideal for a small classroom. The cSmart also features USB plug-and-play compatibility; and is compatible with PCs, Macs, external monitors, DVDs, VCRs and component video, from VGA to SXGA. Philips Electronics, (888) 327-3636, www.philips.com/csmart.

 

 


Toshiba's TLP250 and TLP251 LCD multimedia projectors feature true SVGA, plug-and-play hook ups and compatibility with a wide variety of video sources. These ultraportable projectors utilize Toshiba's short-throw lens technologies, which projects clear, sharp images in any environment with 1,100 ANSI lumens of brightness. Included on both models is a freeze-frame capability, as well as a digital zoom feature, allowing users to highlight and enlarge a particular area. In addition, the TLP251 features a built-in color document camera for added presentation versatility. It is capable of projecting high-resolution images of written materials and 3-D objects from the projector's surface. Toshiba America Consumers Products, (800) 346-6672, www.toshiba.com/presentations.


Case Study: Master's Academy Focuses on Classroom Technology

A group of fourth-graders file into a classroom at Master's Academy and College, a private K-12 school in Calgary, Alberta, and power up their PCs for class. This is the music room, where each workstation has a desktop computer and a piano keyboard. At the front of the room is an interactive white board, the SMART Board. Since its inception, Master's Academy has been dedicated to helping students become lifelong learners and knowledge workers of the future. One of the ways it ensures this is by integrating advanced technology into every classroom. The 600 students at Master's Academy have access to 330 desktop computers, 50 laptops, a digital recording studio, 18 SMART Boards, a mobile multimedia cabinet, the school's network and a host of peripherals, including scanners, printers and digital cameras. This focus on technology has made them one of Western Canada's most technologically advanced schools.

As part of its high-tech strategy, Master's Academy wanted to integrate interactive white boards into its classrooms and settled on SMART Board. "We chose SMART Boards because they offered the range of interactive technology that we required," says Brent Hay, director of Technology and Innovation for Master's Academy. "To be able to capture discussions, archive them for later, and then manipulate them or change them into categories was a natural extension for us." Not only is this technology useful in the classroom, the students can also connect to the school's network from home.

The SMART Board from SMART Technologies Inc., is an interactive white board that works with a computer and data projector. The computer image is projected onto the Board, and instructors press its large, touch-sensitive surface to access and control computer applications. Using a pen from the SMART Pen Tray, teachers can highlight important information by taking notes and annotating over the applications. These notes can then be saved to the school's network or printed for immediate distribution.

Contact Information
SMART Technologies Inc.
Calgary, Alberta
(888) 42-SMART
www.smarttech.com/education

This article originally appeared in the 01/01/2002 issue of THE Journal.

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