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Web 2.0 in education, online education, educational collaborative technologies, Web 3.0, HTML5 in education, google wave in education

HTML5: The Web Beyond Web 2.0

The implications for HTML5 technologies on learning are profound. As technologies become more "intelligent" and requirements shift away from the manual skills needed to use them, teaching and learning can focus more clearly on the processes of thinking and application.

Six Degrees of Speculation

Speculation is as indigenous to Washington, DC as the national monuments; part of the game is trying to understand which rumors, leaks, and parcels of inside information are worth heeding and which are not. I think one bit of speculation now circulating through the Beltway warrants following: Dedicated funding for technology may not be included in the next reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.

Web 2.0 in education, online education, educational collaborative technologies, hybrid learning, blended learning

Bridging the Gap Between Online and On-ground Teaching

Increasing numbers of studies are being done that seem to support the notion that blended course delivery or program delivery really captures the best of every possible world and, as such, is an effective way of learning for students.

More Challenges with Wikis: 4 Ways To Move Students from Passive to Active

While wikis provide an engaging and accessible tool for collaborative work with students, there can be an easy shift back to regular teacher-driven methods in their use as it is difficult and challenging to continue to facilitate collaboration throughout a wiki project. The technology itself does not develop the skill, nor is it the teacher; the technology is only a tool, and teachers must remain committed to the collaborative process, if students are to engage fully and develop the skills necessary to work collaboratively with their peers.

Technology's Impact on Effective Teaching Strategies

While technology has changed what is possible in education, the principles of effective instruction never really change. Technology is not what drives learning but simply what mediates and supports the process. What has significantly changed is the way in which effective teaching strategies can be achieved at a higher level using new technologies.

social networking in school, k-12 social networking, collaborative technology for schools, National School Board Association social networking research

Social Networking in Schools: Incentives for Participation

Research has shown that both schools and parents believe social networking could play a positive role in students' lives, and both are interested in social networking as a tool. So why has social networking not been leveraged more in schools to enhance the education of youth?

NAEP Gets It One-Third Right

A new federally authorized test of students' technology literacy has little in sync with the tech curriculum schools are teaching.

5 Ways We're Diminishing Learning by Assuming Face-to-Face Instruction Is Best

It's interesting that face-to-face instruction is still the measure by which all other forms of instruction are evaluated. As the standard model of instruction for decades, it's often assumed to be the proven method, while other methods have yet to prove themselves. This assumption is not only misleading, but it might also be helping to diminish potential opportunities of better learning for our students.

Beyond Social Networking: Building Toward Learning Communities

Much has been written recently about the impact of social networking tools in teaching and learning and how educators can build on the skills of their students in using these tools. But if educators only integrate the ability of students to connect and socialize, deeper points of learning will be missed. While good teaching and learning rests on effective relationships, in an active learning community, those relationships should evolve into actual idea exchange and knowledge construction.

The Disruption of the Traditional Textbook Model Continues

Texas Governor Rick Perry signed HB 4294 June 19, and the world of textbooks will never be the same in Texas or across the country.

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