Seminar Helps with Legal Issues in Educational Technology

The rapid pace of technological development may leave some schools uncertain about their rights and obligations in the digital age. Thus, the National School Boards Association (NSBA) is hosting a special seminar on the legal implications of new technology and the special legal issues surrounding technology and schools. Topics covered will include student safety and privacy, commercialization concerns, contracting with dot-coms and other companies, and school board use of e-mail. The seminar will be held on February 15-17 in Palm Springs, CA.

The NSBA has also released the results of an online survey regarding technology and advertising in the classroom. The survey was given to more than 300 teachers, school technology staff members, and school board members. Fifty-one percent of respondents believed it acceptable for school districts to use technology products that contain advertisements in the classroom. However, 67 percent said school districts should not use their Web sites to sell products to the community. Ninety-six percent of respondents said that using computers for learning improves students' academic achievement. Ninety-three percent said that there should be minimum technology skill standards implemented for all teachers, and 76 percent feel that their district's teachers are not adequately prepared to use technology in the classroom. NSBA, Alexandria, VA, (703) 838-NSBA, www.nsba.org.The rapid pace of technological development may leave some schools uncertain about their rights and obligations in the digital age. Thus, the National School Boards Association (NSBA) is hosting a special seminar on the legal implications of new technology and the special legal issues surrounding technology and schools. Topics covered will include student safety and privacy, commercialization concerns, contracting with dot-coms and other companies, and school board use of e-mail. The seminar will be held on February 15-17 in Palm Springs, CA.

The NSBA has also released the results of an online survey regarding technology and advertising in the classroom. The survey was given to more than 300 teachers, school technology staff members, and school board members. Fifty-one percent of respondents believed it acceptable for school districts to use technology products that contain advertisements in the classroom. However, 67 percent said school districts should not use their Web sites to sell products to the community. Ninety-six percent of respondents said that using computers for learning improves students' academic achievement. Ninety-three percent said that there should be minimum technology skill standards implemented for all teachers, and 76 percent feel that their district's teachers are not adequately prepared to use technology in the classroom. NSBA, Alexandria, VA, (703) 838-NSBA, www.nsba.org.

This article originally appeared in the 02/01/2001 issue of THE Journal.

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