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Samsung Names 51 State Winners in Solve for Tomorrow Competition

Schools in 50 states and the District of Columbia has been named winners in Samsung's Solve for Tomorrow contest.

The contest called on public school teachers and their students to propose ways to improve their communities through the use of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). The contest has historically focused on the environment, but this year other types of community-oriented improvement proposals were considered.

The 51 state-level winners are each receiving $20,000 in technology prizes. They now move on to the second round, in which 15 national finalists will be named. Those 15 national finalists will receive $35,000 in technology prizes. The will be chosen by a combination of a panel of judges and online public voting (with public votes to be held Feb. 14 to March 13). From those, five national winners will be chosen, and each one will receive a $140,000 technology prize package, which will be awarded in April.

2013 state-level winners included:

  • Alabama: Mckee Middle School
  • Alaska: Akiuk Memorial School
  • Arizona: Imagine School at Avondale Middle School
  • Arkansas: Cedar Ridge High School
  • California: Foothill High School
  • Colorado: Evergreen High School
  • Connecticut: Six to Six Magnet School
  • Delaware: Paul M. Hodgson Vo-Tech
  • Florida: G.W. Carver Middle School
  • Georgia: Camden County High School
  • Hawaii: Kailua High School
  • Idaho: Sandcreek Middle School
  • Illinois: Olympia Middle School
  • Indiana: Penn High School
  • Iowa: Glenwood High School
  • Kansas: Oxford Jr./Sr. High School
  • Kentucky: Powell County High School
  • Louisiana: Simsboro High School
  • Maine: Frank H. Harrison Middle School
  • Maryland: Worcester Technical High School
  • Massachusetts: Nauset Regional High School
  • Michigan: Northwestern Middle School
  • Minnesota: Coon Rapids High School
  • Mississippi: St. Martin High School
  • Missouri: Hazelwood Central High School
  • Montana: Sunburst Jr. High
  • Nebraska: King Science and Technology Magnet Center
  • Nevada: Elko Institute for Academic Achievement
  • New Hampshire: Hillside Middle School
  • New Jersey: Oliver Street School
  • New Mexico: Mescalero Apache School
  • New York: High School of Computers and Technology
  • North Carolina: New Bridge Middle School
  • North Dakota: Ely Elementary School
  • Ohio: Buckeye Trail High School
  • Oklahoma: El Reno High School
  • Oregon: Eddyville Charter School
  • Pennsylvania: Academy at Palumbo
  • Rhode Island: Lincoln High School
  • South Carolina: Irmo High School
  • South Dakota: Vermillion Middle School
  • Tennessee: Bailey STEM Magnet Middle School
  • Texas: Carroll High School
  • Utah: Jordan High School
  • Vermont: Main Street Middle School
  • Virginia: Plaza Middle School
  • Washington: East Valley High School
  • Washington, D.C.: Howard Dilworth Woodson STEM High School
  • West Virginia: Robert L. Bland Middle School
  • Wisconsin: Juda High School
  • Wyoming: Wyoming Indian Middle School

Additional details about the Solve for Tomorrow Challenge can be found on Samsung's site.

About the Author

David Nagel is the executive producer for 1105 Media's online K-12 and higher education publications and electronic newsletters. He can be reached at dnagel@1105media.com. He can now be followed on Twitter at http://twitter.com/THEJournalDave (K-12) or http://twitter.com/CampusTechDave (higher education). You can also connect with him on LinkedIn at http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=10390192.

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