Computer Science

Apple Launches Everyone Can Code Initiative and Apple Teacher Program

The Everyone Can Code initiative will use Apple's Swift Playgrounds app at more than 100 schools this fall. Source: Swift Playgrounds.

While the internet was buzzing over the launch of the iPhone 7 and Apple Watch 2 earlier this week, educators may be interested in another announcement from Apple CEO Tim Cook on computer science education. Cook said that Apple is donating an iPad and Mac to more than 4,500 teachers, iPads to more than 50,000 students and doling out an Apple TV to every classroom in its 114 ConnectED schools. The company also launched a new program for teachers to learn digital literacy on Apple products. 

The technology hand-outs are part of the Everyone Can Code initiative, a newly launched program that provides computer science curriculum to help kids learn how to code. The initiative fulfills a promise that Apple made when it joined the White House-led ConnectED initiative and pledged $100 million “of teaching and learning solutions” to 114 schools in underserved areas across the country.

The Everyone Can Code initiative will employ Apple’s own coding language Swift and leverage the Swift Playgrounds app that was released in June. Cook said that more than 100 schools will learn Swift this fall. 

In line with the message that everyone can code, Apple debuted the Apple Teacher program to help teachers build skills and stay inspired. Educators can sign up for the program to receive product tips, real stories, educational apps and other materials. According to the program website, teachers can complete quizzes and receive “an official Apple Teacher logo.”

To learn more about Everyone Can Code and the Apple Teacher, visit the Apple Education site.

About the Author

Sri Ravipati is Web producer for THE Journal and Campus Technology. She can be reached at sravipati@1105media.com.

THE News Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

Terms and Privacy Policy consent

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.

Whitepapers