K-12 Technology News

Here you'll find the latest news from the education technology world, from the newest hardware and software releases to policy and funding updates to research reports to school and district tech initiatives. Looking for more in-depth coverage of important topics? Be sure to visit our Features page.


Do Pre-K Teachers Even Need College Degrees — Let Alone Online Ones?

A report out from NEPC questions the findings of a report on online programs for pre-K teachers from New America. At the heart of its concerns: whether bachelor's degrees are really essential for the job.

School Agencies and Districts Do Crummy Job of Protecting Website Visitor Security and Privacy

A new study has found that most education websites — whether state or local — do a horrible job of protecting users' security and privacy.

Report: NAEP Setting Bar Too High

According to a new report, when results from "The Nation's Report Card" proficiency assessments are compared to results from two international assessments and the Common Core, the proficiency benchmarks of the National Assessment of Educational Progress would knock out students in almost every country.

Non-Fiction is a Non-Starter in American Classrooms

In spite of the push since the release in 2010 of the Common Core learning standards to get students to read more nonfiction, lift hasn't even reached 10 percent in most states. The only outliers were New Jersey and Vermont, where the gain was greater than 10 percent.

Education Workers Take More Mental Health Days than People in Other Industries

Nearly 60 percent of education employees have taken a "mental health day" to deal with work-related stress, a count that's significantly higher than in other industries. That's according to a recent survey of 1,004 office workers and business decision-makers in the United States and Canada. The survey, conducted by KRC Research on behalf of Staples, asked employees in various industries about current trends in the workplace, including health, wellness and stress issues.

Yes, Charters Do Hurt Public School Funding

As a result of the findings of a new study, researchers encouraged states to "ease the fiscal burden on public school districts," possibly by providing "transitional aid" to reduce the revenue losses to public school districts as charters expand.

FERPA Finding Reminds Schools to Review Terms of Service

Do parents have to relinquish their students' rights under FERPA when the school signs an agreement with a company whose terms of use don't comply with FERPA?

Information of 700 Students Exposed in Assessment Company Data Breach

Information of nearly 700 students was accessed in a breach of Questar Assessment, according to information released by the company.

Ed Tech Competition to Identify Effective Technology Use in Schools

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab North America has launched the Education, Technology and Opportunity Innovation Competition in an effort to identify effective technology use and provide examples of how learning can be improved through innovation. The competition asks school networks, education agencies, nonprofits and post-secondary institutions to evaluate their education programs based on technology, especially those focused on disadvantaged students.

1 in 10 Phishing E-mails Fool Users in Education

In a recent study, 10 percent of simulated phishing e-mails sent to users in education institutions were successful, triggering the recipient to click on a fraudulent link. That's according to the 2018 State of the Phish report from Wombat Security Technologies, in which researchers measured the average click rates on phishing tests across various industries. Education had an average click rate of 10 percent; the industries that performed worst in the tests were telecommunications and retail, with 15 percent and 14 percent average click rates, respectively. 

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